Hoyas/Rhipsalis/Dischidias
Hoyas are a genus of approximately 300 species, native to mostly tropical areas around the world. Australia, also has our fair share of species. They are known for their almost ‘waxy’ looking leaves and their stunning clusters of flowers. Like so many other plants these days, they are grown just as much for their foliage, as their flowers. The leaf shapes, textures, sizes and colours are almost endless and has made this species a favourite amongst many plant lovers. RHIPSALIS; is a genus of epiphytic flowering plants in the cactus family, typically known as mistletoe cacti. Epiphytic plants, are usually found in moist tropical areas, where they generally grow on the surface of another plant, such as the understory of a tree. It derives it’s moisture and nutrients from the air, rain, and from debris accumulating around it. They are native to Central and Southern America and have over 35 different species. They too, have magnificent shapes, colours and textures. They will produce small flowers and also small berries but are usually not grown for these. DISCHIDIAS; are also epiphytic plants in the Apocynaceae family. They are native to tropical areas of China, India and most areas of Indo-China. They are closely aligned with Hoyas, just not as well known. They are also grown for their exotic looking leaves and structure. Most are trailing and cascade beautifully. A very worthy ‘specimen; house plant.

  • HOYA COMPACTA INDIAN ROPE

    $20.00$65.00
    Image is of medium plant. A very unique foliage hoya, with thick, twisted, curly, cupped, solid green leaves. Stunning! Blooms: Pale pink star-shaped flowers, measuring up to 15mm, with a red-centred white corona. Up to 50 flowers per umbel. Light fragrance, especially at night, which resembles chocolate! Sun exposure: Grows best in bright, filtered light. Water requirement: Moderate. Water when almost dry, even less in winter. Prefers well-aerated fast-draining mix. Maintenance: Low.
  • Fungii is reknown for it's huge leaves, which can grow to the size of a small hand.  Leaves are a lighter green, ovate and show a lovely darker green venation.  Fast growing and flowering.  Great for beginners. Blooms: Star-shaped white flowers, measuring 17mm across, with a red corona.  Up to 60 flowers per umbel.  Lovely sweet-smelling fragrance. Flowers last up to 10 days. Sun exposure: Medium to bright indirect light. Water requirement: Prefers well-draining open mix. Water less in winter. Maintenance: Low. Half strength doses of fertiliser in growing season.
  • Unusual cactus which produces masses of offsets on trailing stems. Gorgeous lime/green colour, that can tinge red in sun. Great for hanging baskets! Blooms: Water requirements: Medium. Maintenance: Low. Fertilise at 25% in growing season with soluble fertiliser. Best in morning sun.
  • Long, triangular to square shaped stems, with a white, fuzzy ‘tuft’, spaced along the areoles. Can grow up to 20 inches long and 1 inch wide. Will turn magenta when sun stressed. Blooms: Produces red berry-like seed pods after the small pink flowers. Water requirements: Low. Maintenance: Fertilise at 25% in growing season with soluble fertiliser. Best in morning sun.
  • An epiphytic cactus that freely branches from the base and later from the stem. Dark green with reddish-brown bristly spines. Up to 50cm long. Blooms: White/grey, to red or brown flowers. Water requirements: Medium. Maintenance: Low. Fertilise at 25% in growing season with soluble fertiliser. Best in morning sun.
  • Segmented, long, both flat or triangular stems (depending on age) and can grow up to a metre long. Blooms: Small white flowers, followed by small white berries. Water requirements: Medium Maintenance: Fertilise at 25% in growing season with soluble fertiliser. Best in morning sun.
  • Nicknamed Hairy stemmed Rhipsalis, due to its long draping, narrow leaves, covered in tiny white hairs. Blooms: Scented white flowers at the end of the stems. Water requirements: Medium. Maintenance: Low. Fertilise at 25% in growing season with soluble fertiliser. Best in morning sun.

Hoyas/Rhipsalis/Dischidias
Hoyas are a genus of approximately 300 species, native to mostly tropical areas around the world. Australia, also has our fair share of species. They are known for their almost ‘waxy’ looking leaves and their stunning clusters of flowers. Like so many other plants these days, they are grown just as much for their foliage, as their flowers. The leaf shapes, textures, sizes and colours are almost endless and has made this species a favourite amongst many plant lovers. RHIPSALIS; is a genus of epiphytic flowering plants in the cactus family, typically known as mistletoe cacti. Epiphytic plants, are usually found in moist tropical areas, where they generally grow on the surface of another plant, such as the understory of a tree. It derives it’s moisture and nutrients from the air, rain, and from debris accumulating around it. They are native to Central and Southern America and have over 35 different species. They too, have magnificent shapes, colours and textures. They will produce small flowers and also small berries but are usually not grown for these. DISCHIDIAS; are also epiphytic plants in the Apocynaceae family. They are native to tropical areas of China, India and most areas of Indo-China. They are closely aligned with Hoyas, just not as well known. They are also grown for their exotic looking leaves and structure. Most are trailing and cascade beautifully. A very worthy ‘specimen; house plant.

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